National Poetry Month 2021, Poetry

Tricube

Alright then, I’m back for more poetry!!! And we are soooo close to the end of the A-Z Challenge. Today, I don’t have a lot time for writing, so I’ve chose the tribcube.

Here are the rules of tricubes:

  • Each line contains three syllables.
  • Each stanza contains three lines.
  • Each poem contains three stanzas.

Meditation

I sit here
with the cat
listening.

His soft purrs
vibrating
right through me.

It calms me,
prepares me,
to face things.


A Hundred Times

HIs cock grows:
skin stretching,
blood flowing.

I watch it
come to life
in my hand…

even though I’ve
seen it a
thousand times.


I always feel that each line should legitimately stand on it’s own, but when I’m forced to fit a syllable count, sometimes I have to break my own rule. For example, in this last one, I don’t love the line “seen it a”… I’d prefer a line break like “even though I’ve seen it/a thousand times”. However, trying new forms stretches me, and while I may not write this poem the same if I was allowed more freedom, it’s not a bad way to get the poetry muscles moving. Here’s how I’d write this poem if I wasn’t constrained:

Siren’s Song

His cock grows:
skin stretching,
blood flowing.

I watch it
come to life
in my hand…

I’ve seen it
thousands of times,
and yet
I am still captivated.

I wonder if
that is the intention
of the design…

Like a siren,
it sings its song
and I crash against the rocks.

I find that sometimes a writing exercise…like writing a poem to a form…or writing to a prompt, can simply be the skeleton of something I like better. They are like building blocks that set a foundation for me to get to a place I wouldn’t have gotten to before.

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By Brigit Delaney

Welcome to my little corner of the internet! I am a blogger, poet, photographer, and writer of erotica, living in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. I'm glad you came. Sit back, kick off your shoes, and stay awhile.

1 comment

  1. I find syllable-count poetry to be an excellent paring-down exercise. Trimming the excess to make it fit while still keeping the ‘good bones” of what you’re building is a challenge.

    I do this sometimes with writing tanka. I’m pretty liberal about my phrasing though, so it doesn’t always present in perfect 5-7-5/7-7 — but it always adds up to 31. 🙂
    Mrs Fever recently posted…Sleep… Sleep Tonight…My Profile

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